Flux & Stillness

Concerning the dualities of:
I. All is flux; “One can never step into the same river twice.”
II. There is no flux; everything is stagnant; “Change is an illusion.”

“The circumstances of temporal physicality depend upon the mind which grasps it (and remembers it insofar as to reference it at a later time). Permanence is therefore only relevant to the perceiver so long as he can distinguish any such change; ‘the world is real’ can only mean that the world he remembers is always in some form consistent with the world he presently resides, and one may assume also, that he does not expect these circumstances of temporal physicality to change in the future.”

The nature of our consciousness (mind) records events and categorizes them in relation to its perception of time. Time itself is a measurement of change; and change being a measurement of time. Both conceptions are based upon subjective perception.
What we feel is “real” a.k.a. “permanent,” is also an illusion dependent upon our conceptions of “what hasn’t changed” according to our mental records (which make sense of life).

When we understand that all perceptions and conceptions reliant upon our consciousness/ontology itself are ultimately illusions, we arrive at point II;

“Case 29: Two monks were watching a flag flapping in the wind. One said to the other, ‘The flag is moving.’ The other replied, ‘The wind is moving.’ Huineng overheard this. He said, “Not the flag, not the wind; mind is moving.”

“Stillness” and “flux” are both categorized in the mind as “objective” and “subjective.” Even further so, “objective” and “subjective” become categorized in the mind as “no-mind” and “mind” which is why there seems to be confusion/contradiction. (Confusion/contradiction can only occur with a ‘mind’ to begin with!) ALL is “no-mind” AND “mind,” the key being that which is “no-mind” allows “mind” to bridge what is “only-conceivable/’objective” with what is “only-perceptible/’subjective.”

Therefore, I. (Flux) depends on the mind’s ability to distinguish events by the use of time, and II. (Stillness) depends upon the mind’s ability to un-distinguish events by overlapping particular conceptions of time. Ultimately, the distinguishing/un-distinguishing of events is fabricated by the mind itself.

“Change” is a concept we use to make sense of smaller, subjective scales of experience. “Stillness” is a concept we use to align ourselves with our conceptions of objectivity; the extremes of “change” occurring are both “stillness.”

[Stillness] – (inperceptible change).
Slow change + short duration of change. – (slow and boring change, to the point where you doubt anything is actually occuring).
Moderate change + moderate duration of change. – (when you can be sure something is changing).
Fast change + long duration of change. – (things are changing so much and over such a long period of time that the concept of “things” stop existing)
[Stillness] – (when there’s nothing except perceived change, you realize that by everything always being in flux, this in itself means nothing is happening to anything; “what” exactly is being changed if “it’s” always changing?)

THE BRANKS

Being is the Noun; Form is the adjective.
Matter is the Noun; Motion is the Verb.
Wherefore hath Being clothed itself with Form?
Wherefore hath Matter manifested itself in Motion?
Answer not, O silent one! For THERE is no “wherefore,” no “because.”
The name of THAT is not known; the Pronoun
interprets it, that is, misinterprets It.
Time and Space are adverbs.
Duality begat the Conjunction.
The Conditioned is Father of the Preposition.
The Article also marketh Division; but the Inter-
jection is the sound that endeth in Silence.
Destroy therefore the Eight Parts of Speech; the
Ninth is nigh unto Truth.
This must also be destroyed before thou enterest into Silence.
Aum.

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